INTERVIEW: Jordie Ford

He took the Superkart world by storm is 2015, absolutely smashing the 250 National lap record at Eastern Creek and has since gone on to much bigger and better things, including taking on the world’s best in Europe.

Qld Superkart Club caught up with Jordie Ford to get his side of his exploits and plans for the future.

Queensland Superkart Club: How/When did you get into Karting?

Jordie Ford: First of all thanks so much for the opportunity to join in on your club news and profiles! I started racing Sprint karts in Melbourne when I was 7 but had luckily watched my Dad race since I was born. It didn’t seem to help though…. I completed about 300m until I made a wrong turn too soon, cut the track and had other karts coming head on. It was almost game over before it even started.

How did you find out about Superkarts?

I’d grown up with the Williams family and was always aware of Superkarts, especially as other friends got involved in the mid 2000’s, but it wasn’t until 2014 when Scott Williams threw me in a 250 National and I was sucked into the Superkart World. From there the Williams Racing Team have given me every opportunity to meet new people, travel and race all around the world!

What class have you enjoyed driving the most?

It is tough, I’ve enjoyed success in all the gearbox classes, but nothing beats the raw speed and knife edge limits you feel driving a 250 International Kart. You barely feel in control at times, as if the kart is driving you. You simply have to just hold on! The close racing of 125 open is appealing and fun, but you can’t aspire to race a better vehicle than the Twin.



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What was it like taking on the best in the world over in Europe?

Close, calculative and aggressive. I was taken back at first about how aggressive the drivers are in Europe, but they don’t crash. The respect between drivers is huge and it is so fast. We were surprised we were so competitive but when you have a strong and established team it makes the driving and setup so much easier.

How are you enjoying being a dad? And is she a next generation racer in the making?

Haha I’m not sure if she is a racer yet, but I was sure to make her listen to plenty of racing when she was in Mum’s belly! Being a Dad is the best thing yet, it’s just as exciting to get home each day than it is to race. Whether she races or not, I’m sure she will chase speed as her Mum is an impressive water-skier too.

What are your plans for 2021 and beyond?

It’s hard to tell what future plans will be with a family, I’d love to say that I’ll be chief mechanic for the little one some day, but for myself it will definitely be in karts and Superkarts. There’s nothing more pure, out of control scary and intimidatingly fun than the 250 Twin, so I wouldn’t ever move out of Superkarts. This year we hope to race the National Festival of Superkarts at Phillip Island but it is hard with Covid to make any other plans at this stage.

What would you like to see happen in the world of Superkarting to help promote the sport?

I envy the golden days, the 80s and 90s when we had 60+ grids in 250cc and attention at large events; I wish I were there. I was lucky enough to experience large fields in Europe, although nothing like ‘back in the day’. I hope one day we can create the same enthusiasm and spectacle for the sport that is fast, cheap and impressive. Firstly, unity between clubs and associations needs to form, and embarrassing political unrest could be diminished in such a small pool of people. Hopefully then, promotion and funding will flow and build the sport again. I’m all for presenting our amazing sport to the world!



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